Fun with Fall

October Parenting Tips

  • Take a nature walk and feel the breeze. Grab a basket or bag and have your child pick up items like leaves of different sizes and colors, acorns and twigs.

  • Create a collage. Display the items from your walk by gluing them onto paper or pressing them onto sticky contact paper.

  • Experiment with fall colors.  Offer your child red, yellow, and orange paints. Allow them to paint with their fingers, a paintbrush or items you found on your walk.

  • Try new flavors.  Stores are stocked with new pumpkin and apple flavored foods and drinks. Enjoy a snack with your child and let them describe the new flavor.

  • Cooking. Fall is a great time to involve your child in cooking and trying new foods.

  • Arts and Crafts. Children love to create, and fall offers many fun and educational activities. Visit http://www.candokiddo.com/news/fall-baby-play for fun and safe activities.  https://www.thebestideasforkids.com/pumpkin-slime/

  • Visit your library.  Take a trip to your local library and have your child explore the many seasonal books available.Create a collage. Display the items from your walk by gluing them onto paper or pressing them onto sticky contact paper.

  • Experiment with fall colors.  Offer your child red, yellow, and orange paints. Allow them to paint with their fingers, a paintbrush or items you found on your walk.

  • Try new flavors.  Stores are stocked with new pumpkin and apple flavored foods and drinks. Enjoy a snack with your child and let them describe the new flavor.

  • Cooking. Fall is a great time to involve your child in cooking and trying new foods.

  • Arts and Crafts. Children love to create, and fall offers many fun and educational activities. Visit http://www.candokiddo.com/news/fall-baby-play for fun and safe activities.  https://www.thebestideasforkids.com/pumpkin-slime/

  • Visit your library.  Take a trip to your local library and have your child explore the many seasonal books available.

Tips For Back To School

Time To Re-train Your Child’s Brain

  • Re-set sleep patterns. Wean your child off going to bed late and sleeping late. Start this process sooner than later and help maintain it all year. Good Luck on this one. Be Bold. Be Consistent.

  • Re-set eating habits. The routines of breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, and after-school snack prior to homework need to happen.

  • Get everyone to bed on time. Help your kids get back on track sleep wise by having them go to bed earlier and wake up earlier at least a week in advance of when school actually starts.

  • Make healthy meals. Fix nutritious meals at home.

  • Get a check-up. It is a good idea to take your child in for a physical and an eye exam before school starts. Keep a copy of any medical records.

  • Plan to Read with your child everyday. Make a plan to read with your child for 20 minutes every day. Your example reinforces the importance of literacy, and reading lets you and your child explore new worlds of fun and adventure.

Water Safety at Home

Parents need to keep a close eye on infants and young children, especially as they learn to crawl.

  • Never leave your child alone in the bathtub—even for a moment. Bath seats are only bathing aids and can tip over

  • Empty water from containers, such as large pails and 5-gallon buckets, immediately after use

  • Keep bathroom doors closed. Install doorknob covers or a hook-and-eye latch or other lock that is out of reach

  • Keep toilets closed. Always close the toilet lid, and consider using a toilet lid latch

  • If you have a pool, no one should ever swim alone

  • Empty small blow-up pools after each use

  • Keep toys away from the pool when not in use

  • No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside

  • No electrical appliances near pool

  • No diving in a pool that is not deep enough

  • No running on the pool deck

  • Keep steps or ladders out when the pool is not in use

How Can We Help Kids With Self-Regulation?

What is self-regulation?

Self-regulation is the ability to manage your emotions and behavior in accordance with the demands of the situation. It includes being able to resist highly emotional reactions to upsetting stimuli, to calm yourself down when you get upset, to adjust to a change in expectations and to handle frustration without an outburst. It is a set of skills that enables children, as they mature, to direct their own behavior towards a goal, despite the unpredictability of the world and our own feelings.

  • Avoid situations that are hard for kids to handle

  • Practice runs- if the child has problems at the store or another location, make the trip short and sweet

  • Slow down for the kids, they need time to process

  • Give non-judgmental feedback

Source: https://childmind.org/article/can-help-kids-self-regulation/


Early introduction to gardening with young children

Gardening will help children in their motor, cognitive, and language development. Children will learn to use a small trowel, rake, and hose. They can also explore the texture through the soil. You will help them think through the process of preparing the soil, planting, watering, and weeding. Literacy skills can be another part of gardening. You can ask questions about what you have already done in your garden and what they think you should do next. You can make a map of the area and label what you are planting. Show them the entire plant-roots, stem, leaves, flowers, and seeds. Both you and your children will have opportunities to bond and learn from each other.

  • Prepare the soil. Give them a little rake and a job clearing the rocks out of a small part of your garden

  • Plant strawberries. These plants are kid’s favorite because they can see the little strawberry and do not need much attention

  • Bury some potatoes

  • Sprout a chickpea

Tooth-Friendly Tips for February

Saliva flow decreases during sleep. Without enough saliva, teeth are less able to repair themselves

  • Limit between-meal snacks. This reduces the number of acid attacks on teeth and gives teeth a chance to repair themselves.

  • Save candy, cookies, soda, and other sugary drinks for special occasions

  • Limit fruit juice. 4 oz daily for toddlers age 1-3 years old

  • Limit fruit juice. 4 to 6 oz daily for children ages 4-6

  • Limit fruit juice. 8 oz for ages seven through 18 years old

  • Make sure your child does not eat or drink anything with sugar in it after bedtime tooth brushing.

Meaningful Gift-Giving

  • Give Time, Not Material Objects. Researchers from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania reassure that children build memories, express, and imitate love with the gift of time.

  • Gift the Gift of Giving. A report from Harvard Business School notes that the actual act of giving makes people who give happier and more connected to their communities.

  • Gift Handmade Goodies. A 2015 study published by the Journal of Marketing found that crafty homemade preserves, cookies, art, crochet scarves and mitts, candles and soaps to your loved ones may be consider more loving and worth more than money.

  • Give Something Practical. Sociologists at the University of Virginia recommended giving gifts that the recipient will actually use.

  • Cherished Hand-Me-Downs. A report from a 2009 Journal of Consumer Research noted that family heirlooms and gifts handed down from generation to generation are often accepted with great symbolic value.

  • Most of All…Make it Personal. Personalized, according to psychologist at San Francisco State University, taking the time to find a truly meaningful gift shows that you took the time and effort to track down something unique.

Tips for Guilt-Free Thanksgiving

  • Pick portions wisely. Small portions means eating what you really enjoy.

  • Spread Out the Bounty. Try gathering mid-day to eat the main meal, going for a nice walk, then gathering a few hours later for dessert and coffee.

  • Put the Focus on Family NOT Food. Spend quality time with family and friends.

  • Be Thankful for More than Food. Be thankful for your loved ones. A brisk walk before and after dinner will burn off some of those mashed potato and stuffing calories.

  • Take time and Really Savor. Do this by putting your fork down between bites and thoroughly chewing every mouthful.

Trick-or-Treat!

Halloween is coming soon!  Help your kids have a safe and fun time!

  • Trick-or-Treat with an Adult - Only go to homes with a porch light on.

  • Walk Safely - Cross the street at corners. Always walk on sidewalks or paths. Watch for cars.

  • Keep Costumes Creative and Safe - Decorate costumes with reflective tape or stickers. Have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen.

  • Eat Before You Go - A good meal prior to trick-or-treating can help prevent children from filling up on treats!

  • Treat Safety- Discard anything not completely wrapped. Check treats for your child's allergens.

Have a happy Halloween!

Back to School

Tips for Parents:

  • Meet the new teacher - Take advantage of your school's open house.  Give yourself and your child the chance to meet their new teacher before starting school.
  • Tour the school - Help your child become familiar with their new class or school to help calm nerves.
  • Tool up - Obtain a class supply list and take a special shopping trip with your child.  You can also visit the Back to School Marketplace on Aug. 20, 2018 from 5:00-8:00 p.m. to pick up some items, play games, win prizes, and get haircuts.  Event takes place at the D&R Event Center at 122 E Heron St. in Aberdeen.
  • Chat about today's events and tomorrow's plans - Take time to learn about your child's day.
  • Ease into the routine - Avoid mayhem by practicing your routine a few days in advance.  Routines help children feel comfortable and will make the first day go more smoothly.

Active Adults, Active Children

Being physically active on a regular basis is one of the most important things you can do for your health and your children's health!

There are many benefits to routine physical activity including:

  • Strengthen your bones and muscles
  • Weight control
  • Reduced risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Improved mental health and mood

You can encourage your child to be physically active by:

  • Being active yourself!  You help shape your child's attitudes and behaviors!
  • Make physical activity part of your family's daily routine.
  • Take your children to places, such as parks, where they can be active.  For a quick look at some of our local parks, go to http://www.aberdeenwa.gov/wp-content/uploads/2016ParkBrochure.pdf

Above all, be safe and have fun!

 

 

 

 

April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month

Being a parent is hard work and everyone can have a bad day but, when that bad day becomes too much and you are feeling overwhelmed bad things can happen. If you feel yourself becoming overwhelmed call a friend or family member or anyone who might be a great support for you. If you cannot get help right away put your child in a safe place in the home and take a moment to yourself to calm down.  If you see any signs in someone you know, or if you yourself are involved in an abusive relationship, get help right away. Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline is a 24-hour hotline with resources to aid in every child abuse situation. All calls are confidential. Call 1-800-4 A Child (1-800-422-4453) or go to their website at www.childhelp.org .

Here are ten ways to help prevent child abuse;

  • Be a Nurturing Parent.
  • Children need to know that they are special, loved and capable of following their dreams
  • Help a Friend, Neighbor, or Relative.
  • Being a parent isn't easy. Offer a helping hand to take care of the children, so the parent(s) can rest or spend time together
  • Help Yourself
  • When the big and little problems of your everyday life pile up to the point you feel overwhelmed and out of control-take time out. Don't take it out on your kid.
  • If Your Baby Cries...
  • It can be frustrating to hear your baby cry. Learn what to do if your baby won't stop crying. NEVER shake a baby-shaking a child might result in severe injury or death.

These are just a few. For more information go to: www.preventchildabuse.org

And, remember you child is just starting to learn about the world. Let's not teach them that it is a scary world.

 

Sceen Time for Children

Technology and digital media can have both positive and negative effects on the healthy development of a child.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that "parents and caregivers develop a family media plan that takes into account the health, education and entertainment needs of each child as well as the whole family". 

 Not all screen time is created equal!

  • some cartoons, TV shows, games and apps are more developmentally appropriate than others for toddlers and preschool children.
  • the role you play in how your child is exposed to technology and media is just as important (or even more) than the choice of media itself.

What are the current AAP recommendations?

Children:

  • 0-18 months - avoid use of screen media, other than video-chatting.
  • 18-24 months - if you wish to introduce children to digital media, choose high-quality programming and watch it with them to help them understand what they are seeing.
  • 2-5 years old - limit screen use to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs. Parents should co-view media with children to help them understand what they are seeing and apply it to the world around them. 
  • 6 and older - place consistent limits on the time spent use media, the types of media used, and make sure that it doesn't interfere with adequate sleep, physical activity, and other behaviors that are essential to health.

Where can I find more information?

 

 

Immunizations Are Important!

The best protection against diseases starts early.  Your child can catch bugs that can cause diseases even if you breastfeed.  That's why immunizations are a good idea.  Immunizations are available from your doctor, clinic, neighborhood health center, and local health department.

Ouch!

IT can be hard to take your child for a shot and listen to her cry.  Here are some tips to make things go a bit smoother.

  • Try to stay calm.
  • Hold your child on your lap and gently tell her that you love her.
  • Bring in her favorite comfort item.
  • Before the shot, distract her with a book, a song, or feeding.
  • Tell her it may only hurt for a little while.
  • Plan something fun afterward.

New vaccines may be developed and recommended in the future.  An updated immunization schedule can be found on the CDC Web site.  

Your Child's Milestones

What are milestones?

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving "bye-bye" are called developmental milestones. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, act and move such as crawling, walking etc.

The Center for Disease Control has a milestone checklist and questionnaire. If you feel for any reason that your child is not hitting their milestones talk to your pediatrician.

ACT EARLY!

Center for Disease Control

www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/index.html

 

 

When Should I Introduce Solids?

A good rule of thumb is to watch your baby and not the calendar. Some signs that your baby might be ready for solids...  Able to sit with support  Reaches and grabs, and mouths hands and toys  Baby can show and tell. Around six months of age babies have the ability to say "yes" to wanting food by reaching or leaning toward the food and "no" by pushing or turning away. Expect mixed messages as your baby learns to communicate. Offer, but don't force.  For more information on feeding your baby solids:  https://www.askdrsears.com

A good rule of thumb is to watch your baby and not the calendar. Some signs that your baby might be ready for solids...

Able to sit with support

Reaches and grabs, and mouths hands and toys

Baby can show and tell. Around six months of age babies have the ability to say "yes" to wanting food by reaching or leaning toward the food and "no" by pushing or turning away. Expect mixed messages as your baby learns to communicate. Offer, but don't force.

For more information on feeding your baby solids:

https://www.askdrsears.com